Nonfiction

THE SPANISH AMERICAN ROOTS OF WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

Foreword by David Ignatow [University of Texas Press, 1994]

Landmark work in which Marzán unveils a bicultural William Carlos Williams, revealing that beneath Williams’ ostensibly Anglo verse lies a subtext in which the poet tried to reconcile his Hispanic and American identities.

“I have been waiting for some time for a study of Williams̓s Latin American roots, and this book fills that bill…, a significant addition to the Williams Canon.”
—Paul Mariani

For more, click on book.

===================================================================================

LUNA, LUNA CREATIVE WRITING IDEAS FROM SPANISH, LATIN AMERICAN, AND LATINO LITERATURE, Edited by Julio Marzán [Teachers & Writers Collaborative]

A Teachers & Writers “Best Seller.”

    “A must-have for any educator interested in cultural literacy.” –Ms. Jennifer Marglin, in Amazon Review

   For more, click on book.

====================================================================================

THE NUMINOUS SITE: THE POETRY OF LUIS PALES MATOS

[U.S.: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press| London: Associate University Presses]

Luis Palés Matos, a white poet credited with starting the poesía negra movement in Latin America, is the subject of The Numinous Site. Renown for his satirical (sometimes called racist) word-play and humor, he was misread either as poet  of “white” poems and poet of  “black” Afro-Caribbean themed poems, assumed to be a linguistic diversion, with no semantic or discursive connection to his so-called “white” poems. The Numinous Site connects the branches of Palés Matos’ work, reveals a  poet attempting to define cultural identity as a European descendant in a Caribbean infused with African spirits–in short, a contemplative poet, far more complex than the surface baroque word play already acknowledged. Extrapolating influences of Heidegger, Marzán also traces Palés Matos influence on Williams Carlos Williams’ effort to define himself as a city in Paterson as well as on Nicanor Parra’s later “antipoetry.”   For more, click on book.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s